Do Not Let What You Can’t Do Interfere With What You Can

Thought for the Day: “Do not let what you can’t do interfere with what you can.”
~ Coach Wooden

The day dawned brightly and freshly after the steady, all night downpour. The red clay paths to both the primary and secondary schools were relatively hard packed and free of mud. A crew of older students and workers busily hoisted the roof trusses on the new kitchen, while teetering on makeshift scaffolding. All seemed to be very happy pounding enormous nails or merely standing around.

Don Juan I continued teaching use of the donated calculators to Mr. Sedock’s Form IV B and A classes, assisted by Don III and Mr. Sedock. The students were quite enthusiastic and all were able to arrive at the correct answers to problems posed. Don Marshall later worked in the computer lab and arranged for a prerecorded chemistry “magic show” at 8 PM in the student dining hall.

Don III reviewed mathematical Relations and introduced mathematical Functions to Form III A and B classes. It was very difficult to determine how much the students already knew. They had apparently had no teacher this semester, but appeared familiar with some of the material. ‘Will continue to try to establish a baseline for a regular instructor. When attention seriously lagged, a little harmonica music seemed to reenergize the class. Mr. Sedock is attempting to have the academic schedule rearranged to allow him teach both Form IV and Form III math, as he is the only teacher presently qualified to teach these subjects. The present schedule has both Form classes taught at the same time. When Don mentioned his home state of California, many students wanted to know about Arnold Schwarzenager. They were surprised to know that he spoke no English when he first came to the USA.

We had a really nice traditional African meal (lunch) prepared by Merina and offered by the primary school staff today. It was so nice to know everyone by name. Engera and Donald (Head Mistress and Second Master) both impressed us with their English in welcoming and thanking us. Enock gave a blessing.

Carol: Yea! I finally have a room to teach in and don’t have to move furniture in the teachers’ lounge. At the end of my first period, students did the “Hokey Pokey”. At the end of second period, we started making up a story.

A group of Global Volunteers returned to the primary school later and continued teaching English to the primary school teachers.

Mickey focused on the sewing classes for 10 to 12 year old girls. She later conducted sewing classes for some of the teachers, using the electric sewing machine at the Mission House, powered by a small generator shared with the clinic. The latter group made several beautiful tote bags, using local, colorful material.

A crew of secondary school teachers, students and technicians started surveying for new water lines in front of the Mission House.

Katie only taught one class today, but spent a lot of time talking with teachers about the educational system. She practiced English with some students and later helped some local villagers with computer skills.

In addition to accompanying the Global Volunteers in their various forays, Edward took photos of students and GVers in action in classrooms, of the new kitchen roof raising efforts and of the survey team at the Mission House.

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