Stories of Labyrinths and Minotaurs

Lesley and ManosSometimes, for a moment, things go really well if you just let it play out. In anticipation of our proposed afternoon visit to Knossos, we asked the class to tell us what Lesley and I should know before our visit. It appeared that all had been there, but it was one of our advanced students who taught us about the labyrinth and retold the story of the mythological Minotaur. He had the class (and us) spellbound. Every so often, he would search in vain for the right phrase or word, and then announce, “Just a minute” as he raced out the door and down the sidewalk to ask Sam for the correct English word. The class, which normally has to be in constant motion, waited patiently for the runner to return. Sometimes he just hung onto the doorknob, leaned out the door, and called out to Sam. After a while he suggested that they draw pictures of the Minotaur and labyrinth. Brilliant idea! Although this had been our intent all along, we let the idea come from a student.

If only we could have replicated that experience for the next three classes! 🙂 We played the fly swatter game using the two bodies we drew on the board. They named the correct body part as they swatted it on the board. To make it more challenging, Lesley used sentences like this: I kick a ball with this; I hear with this, etc. We are engaged in a constant delicate balancing act between being somewhat orderly and just getting on with the game and letting the students arrange themselves in the most advantageous lineup so as to beat their opponent. Having said that, they have learned that the game will not continue until all eyes are on the teacher and it is absolutely silent. They shush themselves. Lesley is going to do a follow-up tomorrow on the charming Gruffalo story she read today so she may mention that in her journal entry.

We try to alternate active and quieter activities. We ended the day by playing Go Fish and Bingo in small groups. We have what we think is a great activity planned for tomorrow.

Lesley and I took two buses to get to Knossos. It was a thrill to see the ancient Minoan site and look forward to sharing some photos with them tomorrow. If I were to return to Crete to volunteer, I would bring books of simply retold Greek myths. Today I really wished we had had some books of myths to share with our class.

After our pizza and Greek salad dinner, Sam shared village traditions, rituals, and celebrations surrounding the birth of a child, the mother’s confinement, godfathers and godmothers, baptism, courtship, engagements, weddings, gift giving, death, burial, period of bereavement, and memorial services.

Message for the Day:  “Turn your face to the sun and the shadows fall behind you.” –Maori Proverb

Entry submitted by: Mary Sue 

 

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