Magnify Your Volunteer Efforts in Alto Progreso, Peru

Alto Progreso Peru

On the barren hillsides of Alto Progres, Peru, you can magnify your volunteer efforts by assisting families in need! Within the district of Pamplona – one of 150 destitute communities districts of Lima  – Alto Progreso’s 350 families survive amidst extreme living conditions. Within a sea of more than one million people, children and youth grow up with intermittent electricity, no running water and no sewage system. Water is trucked in and sold by the barrel to their impoverished families.

volunteer in Alto Progreso, Peru

Water is purchased and stored by residents.

Amidst abject poverty and extraordinary unemployment, the Alto Progreso community leadership is optimistic about their future, and committed to making life better for their children. It’s here where Global Volunteers has made a difference since 2015.

Full-time community projects include:

  • Cuna Mas, Niño del Progreso (day care for early childhood): This is a small facility staffed by three local women who care for children birth to three years old Monday through Friday. Volunteers assist the caregivers with feeding, diapering, bathing, and playing with the infants and toddlers. A maximum of two volunteers can be assigned on each service program.
  • Rayito de Sol: This preschool currently teaches 62 kids, ages 3 to 5 in two small classrooms; one for 30 three-year-olds, and another for 32 four- and five-year-olds. Volunteers teach and play with the children, show them how to wash their hands with soap and water, and offer psychosocial support.
  • Community Kitchen (child and elderly feeding program): The government provides rice and beans for children 3 to 17, and senior residents. Each person pays one Sol ($.30) per day which covers the cost for fruits, vegetables, cooking oil, water, etc. Volunteers help the staff prepare meals and feed the children and elders.
  • Labor: The community is always working on improvements, such as building new stairs and walls and painting and repairing community buildings.
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